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Career Advice Employees working with fewer team members are likely to be happier, finds a study

Employees working with fewer team members are likely to be happier, finds a study

An American report says that people working in firms with 10 or fewer employees have the highest happiness levels.
Team Cafemutual Nov 23, 2016

Happiness at work is something nearly everyone wants, but this varies among different factors. According to a recent research by Robert Half, an American human resource consulting firm shows that people working in firms with 10 or fewer employees have the highest happiness levels. It says that organizations with 10,000 or more employees report the lowest happiness quotient.

Vinod Jain in an earlier interview with Cafemutual said, “One must always look for having fewer but better people. Pay them well. Also, the compensation structure should allow them to link their personal goal with the organization’s goal.”

The report was based on data from a survey conducted in July 2016 of more than 12,000 workers in the United States and Canada. Though the survey does not include respondents from India, the insights can be useful for advisers in India as well.

The report also shows that employees who feel proud of their organizations are three times more likely to be happy than those who are not. The second and third top factors driving happiness are feeling appreciated and being treated with fairness and respect.

Encouraging teamwork and cooperation, rather than competition, will help you create a healthy work environment.  “It is important to remember that money is not the only reason employees leave. You need to have a good working environment where your team is comfortable. You need to have proper infrastructure and the work should be challenging enough to help employees gain knowledge and experience,” says Yogin Sabnis of VSK Financial Consultancy.

Amit Bivalkar of Sapient Wealth says, “You never know how much someone means to you until they are gone.So, keep investing in your employees because they yield the best dividends.”

Other findings of the report:

  • Senior executives have the highest happiness levels, while people working in sales and customer service are on the lower end of the spectrum.
  • Different professions have slightly different key drivers of happiness at work. For example, feeling appreciated is a primary factor for accountants, while doing worthwhile work is more important for marketing professionals.
  • For those ages 34 and under, a sense of accomplishment is the strongest determinant of happiness.
  • Workers ages 35 to 54 are the least happy, most stressed out and least interested in their work.
  • Employees ages 55 and up report the highest levels of happiness on the job.
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